Letter of the Week ~ V

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¬†Better late then never, right?! With a Spring baby, a busy, fun-filled Summer and settling back into Fall routines, I fell behind on our Letter of the Week posts. However, I don’t do well with unfinished business, so I will be finishing these posts over the next couple of weeks, in interest of completion ūüôā


 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something¬†opposite¬†to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and¬†plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter V Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose Vexy smurf and Mr Man selected a vase.

I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “V is for Vexy.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

This week our rice bin was transformed into a veterinarian’s office! All of the stuffed animals visited and were cared for by my little vets-in-training!

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Letter Craft:

V is for Vase.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter V from construction paper. Provide some blue water, green stems and a variety of flowers and allow the kids to create! We glued our letter onto a background to help our flowers stay up strong!

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Field Trip: 

V is for veterinarian.

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For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the Veterinary Hospital in our town. The kid’s loved meeting the animal doctors and their patients, trying on the x-ray vest, locating microchips and seeing what goes on behind the scenes at the veterinarians! The lovely front desk staff even put together a great little package for the kids to take home, which included stickers, poop bags, colouring books and animal safety tips! The kids were thrilled!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Art Appreciation ~ Pollock

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I love the arts, especially the creativity it evokes in young people. However, my own artistic ability, as it relates to visual arts, is very limited, and so I thought a fun way to integrate it into our school plan for the year would be through monthly Art Appreciation projects.


We had a blast exploring a number of messy painting methods, in our attempt to emulate Jackson Pollock’s famous abstract expressionist Drip Painting style.

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To prepare I took out a variety of paint colours, some paint trays and necessary items required, which I have listed in each section. Then we put on some paint clothes and had fun getting messy!

String Art

Required Materials: paint, tray, paper, clothespins and pieces of string (approximately 5cm in length)

First up was String Art. Each child was given their materials and created a masterpiece by dragging the string, clamped in the clothespin, through paint and around the paper.

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Marble Art

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Required Materials: paint, tray, paper, marbles (we used 3)

Next up was Marble Art. Each child was given their materials and created a masterpiece by rolling the marbles through blobs of paint and around the paper.

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Splatter Art

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Required Materials: paint, paper, an assortment of “splatter” instruments (those we used are pictured above)

Finally, we had some fun with Splatter Art. For this one, a nice day and some outdoor/easily washable space is highly recommended. Each child was given their materials and access to any of the instruments. Then they each created a unique masterpiece by using their instruments to splatter paint across their paper.

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This was a fantastic art medium for those active kids, who aren’t always willing to sit still for a typical art lesson or craft.

We were also quite intrigued by the variety of outcomes, as no two masterpieces were alike!

All in all we had a great time appreciating Pollock’s art methods!

Have fun and let us know how you made out, if you decide to try it!

Letter of the Week ~ U

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¬†Better late then never, right?! With a Spring baby, a busy, fun-filled Summer and settling back into Fall routines, I fell behind on our Letter of the Week posts. However, I don’t do well with unfinished business, so I will be finishing these posts over the next couple of weeks, in interest of completion ūüôā


 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something¬†opposite¬†to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and¬†plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter U Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma and Mr Man both selected an item of Fire Fighter uniform.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “U is for uniform.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

U is for Underwater.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter U from blue construction paper. Provide some blue tissue paper to attach behind and an assortment of fish to swim around! This doubled as a great fine-motor, counting and colour learning activity, in addition to our letter of the week craft!

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Field Trip: 

U is for uniform.

For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the local Police and Fire Department in our town. The kid’s loved checking out the officer’s vehicles, trying on the uniforms and seeing the ins and outs of both stations!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

 

Letter of the Week ~ T

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¬†Better late then never, right?! With a Spring baby, a busy, fun-filled Summer and settling back into Fall routines, I fell behind on our Letter of the Week posts. However, I don’t do well with unfinished business, so I will be finishing these posts over the next couple of weeks, in interest of completion ūüôā


 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something¬†opposite¬†to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and¬†plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter T¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a tube and Mr Man selected a tool.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “T is for tube.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

T is for Tree.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter T from brown construction paper. Provide a green cloud shape for a tree-top and an assortment of round stickers to add on as apples! This doubled as a great fine-motor and counting activity, in addition to our letter of the week!

 

Field Trip: 

T is for train.¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the new O-Train exhibit for our city. The kid’s loved pretending to ride the train to a variety of imaginary locations!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Camp Google

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Anyone else partaking in this fun and interactive online summer camp put on by Google?

Fun weekly themes, such as, oceans, space, nature and music, presented by experts from National Geographic Kids, Khan Academy, NASA and National Parks.

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We joined in yesterday for the live dive and although the feed was so busy that it wouldn’t load, we were able to participate in the interactive voting and question posing, which the kids found exciting. And when we went back on today,¬†we were able to watch the dive from yesterday in its entirety.

They also have these awesome badges and a badge tracker page to collect and display all of your little one’s accomplishments – a real fun bonus!

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My kids are a few years under the target age range (7-10), but we are still having a blast learning and exploring together

If you have yet to come across Camp Google, it is definitely worth checking out!

Letter of the Week ~ S

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter S¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a sheep and Mr Man selected Sleeping Beauty.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete¬†their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “S is for sheep.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

S is for Snowman.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter S from white construction paper. Provide a black hat,  orange carrot nose, pieces for a mouth, buttons, a scarf and some googly eyes. And allow your child(ren) to create a cute snowman of their very own.

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Field Trip: 

S¬†is for stamps.¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the Canadian stamp collection at our local History Museum. The kid’s loved picking out those with their favourite pictures and Mr Man was especially excited to see both hockey and super hero collections!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

Art Appreciation: Kadinsky

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I love the arts, especially the creativity it evokes in young people. However, my own artistic ability, as it relates to visual arts, is very limited, and so I thought a fun way to integrate it into our school plan for the year would be through monthly Art Appreciation projects.


Back in February we tried our hands at the abstract works of Wassily Kandinsky. 

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After discussing Kadinsky’s background as a founding father of abstract art and exploring how he believed¬†shapes and colours evoked feelings in people (i.e. squares would bring on a sense of calm), we got to work making own interpretations of his painting, Farbstudie Quadrate” (pictured above).

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Using large lengths of easel paper taped to the floor we drew in the squares with pencil and then began painting circles with watercolour paints. The kids enjoyed choosing a variety of colours and worked hard to make each of their circles unique.

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The finished masterpieces were both colourful and individiual!

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Letter of the Week ~ R

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter R¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. This week they both chose ‘Rockets’, which happens when candy is an option, I suppose! Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “R is for Rockets.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

R is for Raccoon.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter R from blue/gray construction paper. Provide black ears, mask, stripes, nose, claws and some googly eyes.

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R¬†is for rest, reading, Rio and racing!¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday Mommy was feeling under the weather, and so Little Momma suggested some R & R at home!

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Hot Wheels Races:

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

Update!

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I’ve been an absent blogger for far too long…but I had a great excuse ūüėÄ

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So very delighted to introduce the newest addition to our family! Meet Babykins, the beautiful little girl, who has already nuzzled her way into our hearts and has 3 adoring siblings to prove it!

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Turns out finding time to blog (let alone bathe, sleep or eat) becomes increasingly difficult with each pregnancy and additional newborn! But I am¬†finally now feeling like I’m¬†returning to “normalcy” (which in my world is really just embracing the chaos!) and am carving out some time to get back to writing and sharing here!

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Photo credit: My wonderful and talented friend, Erin Petruska Photography

 

Letter of the Week ~ Q

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter Q¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a queen and Mr Man selected a quilt.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “Q is for queen.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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 Letter Craft:

Q is for Quilt.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter Q from cardstock. Provide squares of fabric and allow your child(ren) to create their own pattern.

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Field Trip: 

Q is for Quiver, the piece of archery equipment that holds the arrows!

{With some letters we have to get creative!!}

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For this week’s field-trip Friday we visited That Hunting and Fishing Store’s archery range¬†here in Ottawa. The owner, Jen, happily showed the kids how to shoot a bow and arrow and explained the equipment required for archery.

The kids had a great time and even made their own targets at home to use with their Dollar Store bow and arrows!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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