Letter of the Week ~ U

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¬†Better late then never, right?! With a Spring baby, a busy, fun-filled Summer and settling back into Fall routines, I fell behind on our Letter of the Week posts. However, I don’t do well with unfinished business, so I will be finishing these posts over the next couple of weeks, in interest of completion ūüôā


 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something¬†opposite¬†to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and¬†plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter U Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma and Mr Man both selected an item of Fire Fighter uniform.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “U is for uniform.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

U is for Underwater.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter U from blue construction paper. Provide some blue tissue paper to attach behind and an assortment of fish to swim around! This doubled as a great fine-motor, counting and colour learning activity, in addition to our letter of the week craft!

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Field Trip: 

U is for uniform.

For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the local Police and Fire Department in our town. The kid’s loved checking out the officer’s vehicles, trying on the uniforms and seeing the ins and outs of both stations!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

 

Letter of the Week ~ T

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¬†Better late then never, right?! With a Spring baby, a busy, fun-filled Summer and settling back into Fall routines, I fell behind on our Letter of the Week posts. However, I don’t do well with unfinished business, so I will be finishing these posts over the next couple of weeks, in interest of completion ūüôā


 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something¬†opposite¬†to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and¬†plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter T¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a tube and Mr Man selected a tool.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “T is for tube.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

T is for Tree.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter T from brown construction paper. Provide a green cloud shape for a tree-top and an assortment of round stickers to add on as apples! This doubled as a great fine-motor and counting activity, in addition to our letter of the week!

 

Field Trip: 

T is for train.¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the new O-Train exhibit for our city. The kid’s loved pretending to ride the train to a variety of imaginary locations!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Letter of the Week ~ S

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we¬†complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter S¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a sheep and Mr Man selected Sleeping Beauty.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them¬†complete¬†their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “S is for sheep.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

S is for Snowman.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter S from white construction paper. Provide a black hat,  orange carrot nose, pieces for a mouth, buttons, a scarf and some googly eyes. And allow your child(ren) to create a cute snowman of their very own.

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Field Trip: 

S¬†is for stamps.¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday¬†we visited the Canadian stamp collection at our local History Museum. The kid’s loved picking out those with their favourite pictures and Mr Man was especially excited to see both hockey and super hero collections!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

Letter of the Week ~ R

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter R¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. This week they both chose ‘Rockets’, which happens when candy is an option, I suppose! Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “R is for Rockets.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

R is for Raccoon.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter R from blue/gray construction paper. Provide black ears, mask, stripes, nose, claws and some googly eyes.

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R¬†is for rest, reading, Rio and racing!¬†For this week’s field-trip Friday Mommy was feeling under the weather, and so Little Momma suggested some R & R at home!

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Hot Wheels Races:

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

Letter of the Week ~ Q

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter Q¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a queen and Mr Man selected a quilt.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “Q is for queen.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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 Letter Craft:

Q is for Quilt.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter Q from cardstock. Provide squares of fabric and allow your child(ren) to create their own pattern.

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Field Trip: 

Q is for Quiver, the piece of archery equipment that holds the arrows!

{With some letters we have to get creative!!}

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For this week’s field-trip Friday we visited That Hunting and Fishing Store’s archery range¬†here in Ottawa. The owner, Jen, happily showed the kids how to shoot a bow and arrow and explained the equipment required for archery.

The kids had a great time and even made their own targets at home to use with their Dollar Store bow and arrows!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Letter of the Week ~ P

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 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter P¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a police car and Mr Man selected a polar bear.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “P is for police.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

P is for Pig.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter P from pink construction paper. Provide a pig nose, tail and ears cut from pink paper, as well as black details for ears and nostrils and some googly eyes.

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Field Trip: 

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For this week’s field-trip Friday we visited the Parliament buildings¬†here in Ottawa and went up the Peace Tower. The kids loved the view of the city (though they thought it was the whole world!) from up in the clock tower!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

 

Letter of the Week ~ O

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter O Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose Ursula the octopus and Mr Man selected an ogre, Princess Fiona.

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I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “O is for octopus.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

O is for Ostrich.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter O from black construction paper. Provide an ostrich neck, tail and 2 feet cut from pink paper, as well as an orange beak and some googly eyes.

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Field Trip: 

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For this week’s field-trip Friday we visited the National Art Center here in Ottawa¬†for a tour of their orchestra pit. It was pretty neat to see behind the scenes!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Letter of the Week ~ N

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 Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter N Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose some nail polish and Mr Man selected a Ninja Turtle.

I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “N is for nail polish.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.

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Letter Craft:

N is for Night.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter N from black construction paper. Provide a moon and some stars cut from yellow paper. And allow the kids to creatively create their very own night sky!

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Field Trip: 

Fort this week’s field-trip Friday we visited the Wild Bird Sanctuary to check out all of the various bird nests they have on display. The kids thought it was lots of fun to match the display eggs with the appropriate bird’s nest and guess how many eggs each bird likely lays.

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And of course before leaving we took a little stroll and fed some of the birds outside!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Letter of the Week ‚ąľ M

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter M¬†Week:

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a moose and Mr Man selected Michelangelo, the Ninja Turtle (who Little Momma made some paper clothes for).

I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, “M¬†is for moose.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object.¬†Even Baby Girl got in on the letter fun this week!

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Letter Craft:

M is for Moose.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter M from brown construction paper. Provide two beige antlers, as well as nostrils and hooves from black paper. Add some googly eyes and voila Рa moose!

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Field Trip: 

We have been learning about money and so our field trip this week to The Mint, was quite fitting.

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We got to learn how Canadian coins are made, see the Olympic medals from the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and even hold a solid gold bar that is worth over $750,000!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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Letter of the Week ~ L

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Although my personal philosophy of letter learning is that they cannot be studied in isolation and should be learned in the context of words, as this is how we see them most often, we have a letter of the week at Mommy School.

Why, you may ask, do I do something opposite to what I just finished saying I believe in? Well, for one, we don’t study the one letter in isolation. Typically, we complete a letter craft, create a search and find sensory bin using items that begin with that letter, learn about the various sounds the letter makes in different parts of words (because the English language is crazy!) and plan our weekly fieldtrip to somewhere that begins with our letter. Sometimes, I include the letter in other ways throughout our week, but that’s often just a sweet combination of luck and coincidence!


Here’s what we got up to for Letter L Week:

 

Letter Dictionary:

Each of my older children gets the chance to find a hidden object that begins with our letter of the week from the rice bin. This week Little Momma chose a lollipop and Mr Man selected Leonardo, the Ninja Turtle.

I take a photo of the kids with their chosen objects and then have them complete their dictionary page. Little Momma writes a¬†sentence and illustrates, ”¬†L is for lollipop.” and Mr Man copies the upper and lower case letter and then draws his chosen object. We are working on his pencil grasp, but he is tracing – and that my friends is a small miracle!

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Letter Craft:

L is for Ladybug.

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To make your own: Pre-cut an upper-case letter L from red construction paper. Provide a shell from red paper, as well as a face, feet, antennas and dots from black paper. Add googly eyes and voila Рa ladybug!

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Field Trip: 

Our field trip this week was to a landfill, followed by lunch at Luna Cafe.

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Everyone was pretty smitten with the idea of chocolate covered crepes for lunch…and really, can you blame us?!

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Journal Writing: 

To end-off our week the kids each spend some time writing in their journals about our weekly field trip. Often it is pictures for my younger guy with a few scribed¬†sentences, while my eldest will write a few simple sentences on her own, using her word wall, ‘best guess’ spelling and some assistance from myself (she’s my perfectionist!).

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